China

Apply Now: $100,000 in UNESCO International Literacy Prizes

https://i2.wp.com/www.ictworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/unesco-pri... 200w" sizes=" 640px) 100vw, 640px" data-rec

Apply Now: $100,000 in UNESCO International Literacy Prizes

https://i2.wp.com/www.ictworks.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/unesco-pri... 200w" sizes=" 640px) 100vw, 640px" data-rec

Get an ICT4D Job! China, U.S., Nigeria, Philippines

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Innovation in Communication Project Director: Internews is seeking a Project Director to be based in Beijing to perform high level tasks and program implementation focused on mainstreaming I

Improving Beijing’s Urban Transportation with Crowdsourced Mapping

[Guest blog post written by Anahi Ayala Iacucci, Innovation and New Technologies advisor. Anahi was the Ushahidi strategy consultant for the Beijing project in 2011. She blogs at Diary of a Crisis Mapper]

What Has China Done for ICT4D in Africa?

In The China-Africa partnership: effective for education?, Stephen Haggard argues that, up to now, China’s presence in Africa has had disappointing impacts on learning. As in no impact at any scale.

China Strikes

[Guest post: Manfred Elfstrom is a PhD student at Cornell University's School of Industrial and Labor Relations. Before beginning his doctoral studies, Mr. Elfstrom was responsible for China programming at the International Labor Rights Forum and was Campaigns Coordinator at China Labor Watch.]

Our China who art in heaven, hallowed be thy growth rate

UPDATE 4: thanks to all the critics on this post, too bad I couldnt get Chinese censoring technology to work:)
UPDATE 3: 9:30am Sat 10/9: links to Nobel Peace Prize and Charter ’08
UPDATE 2: 1:30pm. New Yorker writer Evan Osnos generously replies to my criticisms (see end of post)
SCOREBOAD UPDATE 10 AM 10/8: understanding key to China’s future development: Nobel Committee 1, New Yorker 0; Liu Xiaobo 1, Justin Lin, 0.
A writer in the New Yorker has an article fawning all over China’s rulers and Chinese economist Justin Lin (currently the Chief Economist of the World Bank).

The coming end to China’s rapid growth

China’s remarkable growth rate is unlikely to last. No country in history has managed to grow nearly so fast for so long.
“China is defying the law of gravity at the moment,” says New York University economist William Easterly, who has tracked economic development for decades. “But that doesn’t mean that gravity is wrong.”

From 1900 to 2000, NYU’s Mr. Easterly says, per-capita growth of all countries ranged between 1% to 3% a year. Nearly all the nations on the high end so far, he says, are democratic capitalist countries — and the additional growth over long periods of time made them rich.
“When we make too much of growth spurts,” he says, “it like making too much of a basketball player who has a hot hand.”

Was the poverty of Africa determined in 1000 BC?

The usual development conversation about determinants of per capita income revolves around modern choices of institutions or economic policies. But what if history is the main determinant of development today?
A paper by Diego Comin, Erick Gong, and myself was just published in the American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics. We collected crude but informative data on the state of technology in various parts of the world in 1000 BC, 0 AD, and 1500 AD.

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