citizenjournalism

Exploring Taboos: When Women Are Blamed for Being Harassed

The second round of workshops in the Exploring Taboos project was recently held in Cairo organized by Nazra team, and at the same time bloggers who took part in the first round of workshops kept on writing about social taboos in Egypt. Under the title “Sexual Rabies”, the blogger Freedom Fighter published post looking back at some of the sexual harassment that took place in early October, as people were celebrating the Muslim feast (Eid).

Understanding our Knowledge Gaps: Or, Do we have an ICT4D field? And do we want one?

Recent discussions, either at already concluded ICT4D conferences and workshops, or here at the Harvard Forum, or in the planning discussions for future conferences, have reminded us of the sometimes strong and often unhelpful disciplinary walls that can be constructed across ICT4D’s cross-disciplinary areas and the common tendency for this field to intellectually jog-in-place.

Policies for the Natives Designed by the Immigrants?: Night Thoughts After a Workshop Day at the Berkman Centre

Three terms appearing in an agenda, "Reputation", "Privacy" and "Quality of Information", and a somewhat vague invitation to think about "Youth Policy" made me recall a moment in my life, a long time ago, when my mother - while I was at school - invaded the privacy o

Bring in the Human Rights

For a more elaborate account of the arguments presented in this essay, see Drake and Jørgensen, Introduction, in Human Rights in the Global Information Society, Rikke Frank Jørgensen (ed.), MIT Press: Cambridge, MA 2006.
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Free Culture Research Workshop 2009 at Harvard Law School

The Free Culture 2009 research workshop built on the enthusiasm generated by the First Interdisciplinary Research Workshop on Free Culture which took place during the 2008 iSummit in Sapporo, Japan.
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Metaphors we regulate by

Many of the celebrated possibilities of the Internet, such as the empowerment of civil society and the advancement of human rights, are presumably linked to the Net’s public features, which potentially foster increased access to information and new means for contributing to the public domain of knowledge.read more

Metaphors We Regulate By

Many of the celebrated possibilities of the Internet, such as the empowerment of civil society and the advancement of human rights, are presumably linked to the Net’s public features, which potentially foster increased access to information and new means for contributing to the public domain of knowledge.read more

Metaphors we regulate by

Many of the celebrated possibilities of the Internet, such as the empowerment of civil society and the advancement of human rights, are presumably linked to the Net’s public features, which potentially foster increased access to information and new means for contributing to the public domain of knowledge.
read more

Metaphors we regulate by

Many of the celebrated possibilities of the Internet, such as the empowerment of civil society and the advancement of human rights, are presumably linked to the Net’s public features, which potentially foster increased access to information and new means for contributing to the public domain of knowledge.
read more

A Brief Overview of U.S. Public Policy on OER from California's Community Colleges to the Obama Administration

This post draws significantly from an interview on August 10, 2009 with Hal Plotkin, a Senior Advisor at the U.S. Dept. of Education, who has closely followed and been involved with OER policies in California.
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ICT Diffusion: Have we really made any progress?

It is undoubted that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is often considered as one of the main pillars for human and socio-economic development. It is therefore widely recognized that ICTs are becoming increasingly popular as tools for improving human, technical and financial capital for the benefit of individuals, communities and nation-states.

A Response to "A Dialogue on ICTs, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction"

If we imagine Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle falling asleep in a developing nation in 1998 and awaking today, it's likely that he'd be fascinated and surprised by mobile phones. When Rip went to sleep, only a few hundred million people had access to mobile phones, and most lived in wealthy nations.

Social Enterprise to Mobiles – The Curious Case of a Propped up ICTD Theory

Appropriating the tremendous potential of new ICTs for meeting development challenges requires a sound theoretical basis – drawing from the social theories of ICTs and connecting them to the experience and values of development thought and practice.
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