Diversity and Global Inclusion

Understanding our Knowledge Gaps: Or, Do we have an ICT4D field? And do we want one?

Recent discussions, either at already concluded ICT4D conferences and workshops, or here at the Harvard Forum, or in the planning discussions for future conferences, have reminded us of the sometimes strong and often unhelpful disciplinary walls that can be constructed across ICT4D’s cross-disciplinary areas and the common tendency for this field to intellectually jog-in-place.

ICT Diffusion: Have we really made any progress?

It is undoubted that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is often considered as one of the main pillars for human and socio-economic development. It is therefore widely recognized that ICTs are becoming increasingly popular as tools for improving human, technical and financial capital for the benefit of individuals, communities and nation-states.

A Response to "A Dialogue on ICTs, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction"

If we imagine Washington Irving's Rip Van Winkle falling asleep in a developing nation in 1998 and awaking today, it's likely that he'd be fascinated and surprised by mobile phones. When Rip went to sleep, only a few hundred million people had access to mobile phones, and most lived in wealthy nations.

Social Enterprise to Mobiles – The Curious Case of a Propped up ICTD Theory

Appropriating the tremendous potential of new ICTs for meeting development challenges requires a sound theoretical basis – drawing from the social theories of ICTs and connecting them to the experience and values of development thought and practice.
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A Response to "A Dialogue on ICTs, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction"

In general terms, I found the paper (A Dialogue on ICTs, Human Development, Growth, and Poverty Reduction) fascinating and provocative, as it is one of the first attempts that I am aware of to link two insofar separate fields, i.e., organizational theory and ICT4D.

The Poverty of Policy and Practice [1]

For the last five years since Harvard I, Research ICT Africa (RIA) has been systematically collecting current supply side ICT indicators, and developing the only systematic demand side ICT indicators, in 18 countries across the continent in order to understand policy reform on the continent.
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Access Beyond Developmentalism: Technology and the Intellectual Life of the Poor

In February 2009 we invited the French philosopher Jacques Ranciere to Delhi for the release of his book “Nights of Labour” which we had translated into Hindi, and to have a conversation with a group of young writers and practitioners at the Cybermohalla (“CM”) in Dakshinpuri.

A Response to "A Dialogue on ICTs, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction"

1.0    What has changed since 2003?
Many things, but the most significant in terms of developing countries is the transformation of the role and position of mobile networks and services.  
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A Response to "A Dialogue on ICTs, Human Development, Growth and Poverty Reduction"

There has been great progress in identifying important services (informational and financial and other) that affect the ability of the poor and indeed large parts of developing country populations to conduct transactions at reasonable cost and to start and run businesses.  That said there is evidence that this progress is far from complete.
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The Looming Destruction of the Global Communications Environment

Ask most citizens worldwide to identify the most pressing issue facing humanity as a whole and they will likely respond with global warming. However, there is another environmental catastrophe looming: the degradation of the global communications environment.
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