Haiti

Aucun homme n'est une île: les solutions TIC pour reconnecter Haïti

Dix jours après le violent séisme en Haïti, deux techniciens d’Inveneo, CIO Mark Summer et Andris Bjornson, sont arrivés sur place pour le déploiement d’un réseau wifi longue distance dont bénéficieront les organisations partenaires de NetHope situées à Port-au-Prince. Ce réseau permettra à ces organisations humanitaires d’accéder à l’Internet, d’utiliser la téléphonie VoIP, de collaborer et de partager l’information.
Après une catastrophe naturelle, la restauration de la communication est essentielle et plusieurs organismes comme Inveneo sont en train de mettre en place leurs propres solutions TIC afin de soutenir les efforts de la reconstruction en Haïti :

Big Crisis, Small Help: Microcredit’s role in crisis relief…

Hollywood couldn’t have done it better. Late in the afternoon on Jan. 22, an armored car packed with $2 million in cash rolled out of J.P. Morgan Chase headquarters in downtown Miami, headed to the Homestead Air Force Base. Thirty-four bricks of bank notes packed into ordinary office supply boxes were loaded onto a C-17 [...]

CGAP: Haiti’s Path to Recovery…

CGAP: On January 12, 2010, a catastrophic 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti, causing immense destruction in the densely populated capital of Port-au-Prince and nearby areas. This natural disaster killed over 200,000 people and uprooted the lives of millions, bringing unspeakable personal losses to the population of an already poor country.
Three weeks after the earthquake, some [...]

Haiti Earthquake Facts and Figures, Latest Update

The UN gives the latest facts and figures on Haiti recovery efforts, including mortality and displacement estimates.

The Haitian government has not issued a mortality estimate since January 28, when the government said that 112,405 had died. However, on February 3 the government said that as many as 200,000 may have been killed in the earthquake.  Meanwhile, one of the major new developments of the past week has been a mass exodus from Port au Prince to rural areas.

SMS Turks

If you’ve been reading along on the Ushahidi Blog, you will know that the coordination efforts around the Haitian Earthquake have been nothing short of amazing. The students and volunteers at the Fletcher School Situation Room, the translation volunteers on the Mission 4636 project, the teams and staff of Digicel, Comcel, Energy for Opportunity, FrontlineSMS, InSTEDD, Sahana, Cartika Hosting, the US State Department, almost all branches of the US Military providing humanitarian response and a list of individuals and organizations that could honestly go on forever, have come together in an unprecedented way to work together to help solve problems on the ground and to get information out to any and all interested parties.

SMS Turks

If you’ve been reading along on the Ushahidi Blog, you will know that the coordination efforts around the Haitian Earthquake have been nothing short of amazing. The students and volunteers at the Fletcher School Situation Room, the translation volunteers on the Mission 4636 project, the teams and staff of Digicel, Comcel, Energy for Opportunity, FrontlineSMS, InSTEDD, Sahana, Cartika Hosting, the US State Department, almost all branches of the US Military providing humanitarian response and a list of individuals and organizations that could honestly go on forever, have come together in an unprecedented way to work together to help solve problems on the ground and to get information out to any and all interested parties.

Haiti: Taking Stock of How We Are Doing

Day 25. Volunteers have mapped almost 2,500 reports on Ushahidi-Haiti with about half coming from urgent and actionable text messages. The site was launched just hours after the earthquake. Since then, some 300 volunteers in Boston, DC, Montreal, Geneva, London and Portland have been trained, including some members of the Haitian Diaspora, to continue mapping around the clock. But tracking how responders are using Ushahidi at a tactical level has been a challenge—one that is nicely summarized by Clark Craig with the Marine Corps:

Haiti: Taking Stock of How We Are Doing

Day 25. Volunteers have mapped almost 2,500 reports on Ushahidi-Haiti with about half coming from urgent and actionable text messages. The site was launched just hours after the earthquake. Since then, some 300 volunteers in Boston, DC, Montreal, Geneva, London and Portland have been trained, including some members of the Haitian Diaspora, to continue mapping around the clock. But tracking how responders are using Ushahidi at a tactical level has been a challenge—one that is nicely summarized by Clark Craig with the Marine Corps:

Child Protection: from Emergency Response to a Sustainable Mechanism

There is a lot of talk about “Child Protection” these days and an increased awareness of the vulnerability of children who are separated from their parents or who have lost them due to the Haiti earthquake   But what exactly does “Child Protection” mean?  What does a child protection system look like on the ground?  How can child protection mechanisms be set up during an emergency phase, and how can they be turned into a sustainable mechanism post-crisis?

UNESCO Protecting Haiti's Heritage

UNESCO announced today that it is launching a campaign to protect the cultural heritage of Haiti, which will be an indispensable element in reconstruction.

UNESCO announced today that it is launching a campaign to protect the cultural heritage of Haiti.  Amid the carnage, this may seem like a low priority, but, as Director General Irina Bokova explained:

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