software development

Stop Reinventing the Flat Tire with Custom Software Development

Reinventingthewheel
News flash: most nonprofits are terrible at software development, open-sourcing is not a sustainability plan, and constantly re-inventing the wheel is a poor way to spend limited resources.

Africans Should be Developing for Smartphones, Not USSD or Feature Phones

Recently, TechCrunch made the bold prediction that in five years’ time, most sub-Saharan Africans will have smartphones. At first I thought this just more mobile phone hyperbole.

Cometh the hour. Cometh the technology.

For NGOs and developers alike, the ICT4D space can be a tough nut to crack. While NGOs generally struggle to find the tools they need to meet their particular needs, developers face the opposite problem – getting their tools into the hands of those who need them the most.

Juba: Announcing Ushahidi v2.2

Ladies and gentlemen, it’s that phase of the software development life-cycle when the ninjas at Ushahidi share what they have been working on: Ushahidi Version 2.2 code -named Juba. Juba is a city in South Sudan. (We name all our code releases after African cities.)

We’re Moving to Git Issues!

We’re moving technical ticketing, bugs and feature requests to Git Issues using github. RedMine was a good Ushahidi Development (http://dev.ushahidi.com/) home, but Git Issues functionality meets our community needs to commit, plan, collect and comment.

Students learn programming with Ushahidi

[Guest post: Cam Macdonell is an Instructor of Computer Science at Grant MacEwan University in Edmonton, AB. He completed his PhD from the University of Alberta in 2011 and began teaching at Grant MacEwan in September, 2011.]

Building mobile applications for social good

“If you were thinking of designing or building a website, you’d be in luck. If you were thinking of writing a suite of financial management tools, you’d be in luck. If you were even thinking of creating the next big video game, you’d be in luck. Visit any good bookstore and the selection of self-help books and “how-to” guides leave you spoilt for choice. 

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