Swiftriver

Bittersweet Farewell to SwiftRiver

We started SwiftRiver with the lofty vision for a simple tool that quickly reveals insights hidden within the massive streaming real-time information flowing in from all web, mobile, and social sources.

Shipping It: A 2013 Ushahidi Update

2013 has proved to be a big one for us at Ushahidi. Coming from a 2012 where a lot was done, but where we all felt we weren’t shipping enough product, the acceleration has proved to be refreshing. At this year’s meeting we made a commitment to organize better towards this, and the fruits have borne out.

Weekly: Hiring, Inundaciones (Argentina)

Happy Week! In this week’s Community Report, we’re happy to say we are hiring, Congratulations to the hard working folks from Argentina (our Deployment of the Week), a new SwiftRiver event and thanks to our amazing community from Grant MacEwan University and Nepal.

UMATI- Monitoring Dangerous Speech Online

This is a blogpost by Angela Crandall, one of the Research Leads at iHub Research, Nairobi. 

Weekly: Community Leaders, IDEO hackathon

Community and code – can this week be any better! In the weekly, we are proud to recognize some amazing community leaders, announcing even more new code (who needs sleep?) and, finally, share some upcoming events including an IDEO hackathon.

Weekly: Swift Code, PowerCuts and Mobile

Happy week! We have a few gems to share with you. First off, two of our favourite words: Public. Open.
Into the Code: SwiftRiver code is now on github.

Algorithms Augmenting Human Decisions

Here’s an update about the SwiftRiver platform from PDF11 which I had the pleasure of speaking at yesterday. My slides are below and here you can find video of my presentation.

The Sweeper User Guide

Sweeper has been around for just over a year now and although the code is still changing quite rapidly. However, the core platform is now stable enough that we’re releasing this User’s Guide. It’s certainly long overdue. Sweeper is the a free and opensource multimedia curation platform that we’ve been developing over the past few months.

Realtime Translation with SwiftRiver

One of the problems a lot of crowdsourcing projects have is that they end up pulling in massive amounts of data from the web, Twitter and other channels from around the world. This means content arrives in many different languages, often languages that the deployer doesn’t speak.

Auto-Detection of Location with Swift

The following post was written by a volunteer developer, Vladimir G. Ermakov a Master’s student at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pennsylvania. Over the past few months he took on an ambitious project: to contribute code that would allow us to parse news articles and attempt to auto-detect the primary location that is the subject of any given text.

Discovering Content Sources with SwiftMeme

One of the big requests we’ve had from users of Ushahidi products is “What if I don’t know what feeds or sources to follow?” Whether it’s from humanitarian groups or corporates, some organizations have the cold-start problem of not knowing who to to listen regarding specific subjects.
Alongside the next release of the SwiftRiver platform we’re releasing a new application called SwiftMeme, our source discovery and meme tracking application.

SwiftMeme early mockupSwiftMeme early mockup

Crowdsourcing and Chaos Theory

Below you’ll find the basis for my Ignite talk from ICCM10 in Boston originally titled “Veracity Blues: The Trouble with Crowdsourcing”.
varsity-blues-800-75
Would you trust these guys with your data?

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