Volunteers

Ushahidi supports Mozambique general election.

Ushahidi team members recently provided blogger training and deployment consultation for the Txeka-la initiative monitoring the Mozambique general election and engaging community through mapping. From the Canadian High Commission YouTube post:

Highlighting 2010′s Extraordinary Volunteers

Ushahidi creates open source platforms, which means that we rely heavily upon the community of practitioners, coders and fans in order to make things work.

Got feedback?

For the past year, I’ve had the pleasure to work with Ushahidi to gather feedback from people all over the world who have put the platform to work. I’ve found it incredibly inspiring to learn about their implementations and see how Ushahidi has evolved in response to their needs.

Got feedback?

For the past year, I’ve had the pleasure to work with Ushahidi to gather feedback from people all over the world who have put the platform to work. I’ve found it incredibly inspiring to learn about their implementations and see how Ushahidi has evolved in response to their needs.

Ushahidi in the Classroom

My name is Nick Martin, President of TechChange: The Institute for Technology and Social Change. Last month I taught the first ever course on “Technology and Peace” at the UN-mandated University for Peace (UPEACE) in Costa Rica. The course drew 16 participants from 11 countries, representing a number of distinguished organizations including Ashoka, the Council on Foreign Relations and George Mason University’s Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (ICAR).
Ushahidi Sim (1)

Crowdsourcing with Humanitarians in Training

[Guest blog post: Sayon Dutta is an emergency medicine physician with prior training in aerospace engineering and currently is completing a research fellowship in applied technologies. His research includes GIS and mobile technologies in humanitarian emergencies and the utilization of medical informatics to improve patient care in the Emergency Department. He is a key contributor the the HSI simulation applied technology module. Jennifer Chan is an associate faculty member at Harvard Humanitarian Initiative (HHI), an emergency medicine physician and public health provider. She is a technical consultant and field researcher for humanitarian NGOs with the Program on Humanitarian Effectiveness.

Mozilla Foundation Supports Ushahidi-Chile

A guest post from the team running Ushahidi’s Situation Room at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA).

Ushahidi-Chile: Reflections after Week One

Caroline Stauffer is a member of the core SIPA Team deploying the Ushahidi-Chile platform. She is a graduate student at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) where she focuses on International Media and Communications. She spent the past summer working with the Associated Press in Bangkok, and worked for a nongovernmental organization in the Dominican Republic prior to SIPA.

SIPA Volunteers Take Lead on Ushahidi-Chile

Our dedicated team of volunteers have mapped over 100 reports including many pictures, and this less than 48 hours after the deployment of the Ushahidi-Chile platform. During this time, I worked directly with colleagues from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA), my alma mater, to help them set up their own Situation Room and take the lead on Ushahidi-Chile. Our partners Digital Democracy (D2) once again played an instrumental role and provided the SIPA Team with the full Ushahidi training they needed. Many thanks to both!

Volunteers Respond with Ushahidi-Chile

I learned about the massive earthquake at 7:00 A.M. EST and immediately got in touch with the Ushahidi Tech Team to set up an Ushahidi-Chile platform. I then reached out to my colleagues from The Fletcher School at Tufts University and others who contributed their time to the Haiti deployment. They are are now responding to the earthquake in Chile and tsunami effected countries. This time, however, the volunteers are trained and the Ushahidi Tech Team simply cloned the Ushahidi-Haiti version for Chile. We’re already busy customizing the deployment for Chile.

Taking the Lead: Ushahidi-Haiti @ Tufts

The outstanding volunteer team at Tufts University has played an instrumental role in Ushahidi’s response to Haiti. They  trained hundreds of volunteers and set up Situation Rooms in Washington DC, Geneva, London and Portland. Together, they mapped over 3,000 urgent and actionable reports on Ushahidi-Haiti from a multitude of sources including text messages from Haiti. They also coordinated directly with responders on the ground and helped save hundreds of lives.

SMS Turks

If you’ve been reading along on the Ushahidi Blog, you will know that the coordination efforts around the Haitian Earthquake have been nothing short of amazing. The students and volunteers at the Fletcher School Situation Room, the translation volunteers on the Mission 4636 project, the teams and staff of Digicel, Comcel, Energy for Opportunity, FrontlineSMS, InSTEDD, Sahana, Cartika Hosting, the US State Department, almost all branches of the US Military providing humanitarian response and a list of individuals and organizations that could honestly go on forever, have come together in an unprecedented way to work together to help solve problems on the ground and to get information out to any and all interested parties.

SMS Turks

If you’ve been reading along on the Ushahidi Blog, you will know that the coordination efforts around the Haitian Earthquake have been nothing short of amazing. The students and volunteers at the Fletcher School Situation Room, the translation volunteers on the Mission 4636 project, the teams and staff of Digicel, Comcel, Energy for Opportunity, FrontlineSMS, InSTEDD, Sahana, Cartika Hosting, the US State Department, almost all branches of the US Military providing humanitarian response and a list of individuals and organizations that could honestly go on forever, have come together in an unprecedented way to work together to help solve problems on the ground and to get information out to any and all interested parties.

Haiti: Where We Are & Where We Go From Here

When I called David Kobia to launch the Ushahidi platform two hours after the earthquake, our priority was to map all relevant reports in near real-time and to do so around the clock. This meant monitoring Tweets, Facebook groups, list serves, emails, online news media, blogs, radio and television programs, and now incoming SMS. That’s not all, we also needed to turn this information into semi-structured reports and actually geo-tag them. No small task. That is why I immediately set up the Haiti Situation Room at The Fletcher School and why my Fletcher colleagues have since set up similar Situation Rooms in Washington DC, Geneva, London and Portland.

Haiti: Where We Are & Where We Go From Here

When I called David Kobia to launch the Ushahidi platform two hours after the earthquake, our priority was to map all relevant reports in near real-time and to do so around the clock. This meant monitoring Tweets, Facebook groups, list serves, emails, online news media, blogs, radio and television programs, and now incoming SMS. That’s not all, we also needed to turn this information into semi-structured reports and actually geo-tag them. No small task. That is why I immediately set up the Haiti Situation Room at The Fletcher School and why my Fletcher colleagues have since set up similar Situation Rooms in Washington DC, Geneva, London and Portland.

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