History

Which is better, 10,000 reports or 10,000 maps? (Part 1/2)

(This is part one of two posts on Ushahidi as an organization, it sets up the historical context of how we think about who we are and how we think of success in our space, so that the next post makes more sense on what we’re doing next.)

A History of the World in 101 Objects?

A History of the World in 100 Objects“ is a fascinating book. A joint project of the British Museum and BBC Radio 4, it uses objects of ancient art, industry and technology as an introduction to key events in human history.

Superstition and Development

By Peter T. Leeson, BB&T Professor for the Study of Capitalism at George Mason University.
Gypsies believe that the lower half of the human body is invisibly polluted, that supernatural defilement is supernaturally contagious, and that non-Gypsies are spiritually toxic.
Far from irrational, these superstitions are central to Gypsies’ system of social order. Gypsies can’t rely on government-created legal institutions to support cooperation between them. Many of their economic and social relationships are unrecognized or illegal according to state law. Yet Gypsies’ need for law and order is as strong as anyone else’s.

More well-deserved Crisis Recognition for economists: Carmen Reinhart and Ken Rogoff

The NYT Business Section on their book, This Time Is Different.
It’s nice when a fat book covering 800 years of financial crises can be summed up in one 4-word title, and then the message of the text in one 3-word response: No It’s Not.
Or as the authors put it, We’ve Been Here Before.

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